The Saltash Shaddocks

by Philip Shaddock

The Saltash Shaddocks are a branch of the Culmstock Shaddocks. To see where they fit into the Culmstock family tree, see the graphic at the top of the Culmstock Shaddocks page. I would like to thank Andrew Shaddock, a direct descendant of the Saltash Shaddocks for the pictures and information about his family on this page.

William Shaddock (1827-1899) alderman and mayor of Saltash.

I had been aware of the Saltash Shaddocks, but never knew where they belonged in the family tree. David J. Shaddock, who belongs to a branch of the Culmstock Shaddocks I call the Wellington, Somerset Shaddocks, once told me there was a legend in his family that they were related to a William Shaddock, who was a mayor of Plymouth. But I could not connect him to William. 

Months later, in an unrelated search I found George E. Shaddock, who was granted land in Saskatchewan in Canada. That is my country so I decided to follow his paper trail back to England. It led me back to Plymouth (across the river from Saltash) where George Ewart Shaddock (1885-1943) was born. Then I scrambled up the tree to William Shaddock, born 1828 in Bradninch, just south of Culmstock. And finally to John Shaddock, born 1783 in Culmstock. 

When I finally created the graphic for the Culmstock family tree, I was surprised. David J. Shaddock's third great grandfather was John Shaddock, born 1765 in Culmstock, the father of William Shaddock, born 1827 in Bradninch. There had been a family connection after all, it was just not a direct connection. William Shaddock was David's 2nd great uncle. David Shaddock's information was helpful in confirming the Culmstock origin of the Plymouth Shaddocks. 

Actually the connection was to Saltash, across the river Tamar from Plymouth. William was the mayor of Saltash, not Plymouth. There is a reference in a history of Saltash. It was written in 1893 and appeared in “Hunter & Millers Illustrated year Book" It was titled "The Borough of Saltash" by bAlderman P.E.B. Porter (Mayor). He tells us that when William was mayor he applied an especially harsh sentence to an "old offender."

The final severe sentence was in 1877, William Shaddock, Esq., being then Mayor, an old offender, out on ticket of leave, was transported for 7 years for stealing a watch at the regatta. 

William was acting as a judge at the Assizes, a traveling court. Of course the severity of his sentence for the theft of a watch now appears to be as severe as Mayor Porter is eager to tell us. And a very distant relation of Mayor William Shaddock, who happens to have the same name, William Shaddock (1818-1902), was sentenced in the Nearby Exeter Assizes to 15 years transportation to Australia in 1856 for stealing food for his family. (I think it turned out to be a blessing, as he did very well in Australia. See the Mourambine Shaddicks.) I think the fact the Mayor brings it up in his history smacks of political infighting.

I know for certain William's father John Shaddock (1783-) was born in Culmstock, but I did not find the name of his father or mother on the birth record. I may have him assigned to the wrong father. But the fact David J. Shaddock remembers a family story about a "mayor of Plymouth" was a relation tells me that he was indeed a Culmstock Shaddock and in the same branch of the family as David. If that is the case, then William is actually not descended from a male Shaddock, but a female Shaddock (Jane Shatticke born 1683 in Culmstock) who had a son named Edward Shaddock born in 1704 out of wedlock. The father was named Edward Thomas. We have a way of determining if I have chosen the correct grandfather for William Shaddock. All I need to do is Y-DNA test one of John Shaddock's male descendants. Testing one male descendant who proves not to be a match with another Shattocke would help support my choice. Testing a second and a third would make the case much stronger by narrowing his ancestry to specific Shattocke lineages. 

The village where William was born, Bradninch, is the site of an ancient manor that used to be the largest in the time of William the Conqueror. The present day town council describes its economic history: "A flourishing woollen industry, pillow lace making and farming were the mainstays of the area." It apparently has a paper mill. 

William's father John was a wool comber, working in a mill to separate the fibers in raw wool to make it easier for spinning them into textiles. It as an apprenticed trade, with apprenticing starting at age 12 or 13 and lasting as long as 15 years. Once more we have an example of a parent who was a skilled tradesman who passed on this dedication to a trade to sons. And they went on to be skilled tradesmen in their own right. My guess is that William was apprenticed to a building trade when quite young. He was had the financial wherewithal to marry at age 22.


Arms of Prideaux: Argent, a chevron sable in chief a label of three points gules

William Shaddock married Flora Prideaux in July 1850 in Newton Abbot, up the coast from Saltash. He married well. "Prideaux" is an ancient Cornwall family with a genealogy all the way back to the Norman conquest. Here is what we find at Wikipedia:

The Prideaux family is believed to be of Norman origin and to have first settled in England at some time after the Norman Conquest of 1066 at Prideaux Castle, near Fowey, in Cornwall. It abandoned that seat and moved to Devon, where it spread out in various branches, most notably at Orcharton, Modbury; Adeston, Holbeton; Thuborough, Sutcombe; Soldon, Holsworthy; Netherton, Farway; Ashburton; Nutwell, Woodbury and Ford Abbey, Thorncombe. It was one of the most widespread and successful of all the gentry families of Devon, and as remarked upon by Swete (d.1821), exceptionally most of the expansion was performed by younger sons, who by the custom of primogeniture were expected to make their own fortunes. 

There is another source for a history of this Shaddock family. It is in the form of a letter written to my 4th cousin Cliff Shaddock from Peter J Shaddock (1925-), who Clive had befriended. It was written in 1986 in Plympton, on the other side of Plymouth. In the letter Peter outlines his family tree, beginning with William and his wife Flora Prideaux. 


Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859)

He believes his great grandfather William and great grandmother Flora were from Shaldon, east of Newton Abbot on the river Teign. It was Flora who was from Shaldon, not William. William was born 32 km (20 miles) north of Shaldon in Bradninch. Perhaps William had moved south to the Newton Abbot area. His occupation appears to be as a contractor, as the trade papers of the times show him on a list of contractors bidding for jobs. 

Peter tells us that he worked for the famous engineer and architect Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859). Brunel built the Royal Albert Hall. But there is another project that probably explains how William and Flora ended up in Saltash. Brunel designed the Royal Albert Bridge, a railway bridge that spans the river Tamar, connecting Saltash to Plymouth.

Peter tells us that William worked for Brunel on the building of the bridge. The picture at left shows us the bridge under construction in 1854. Indeed in the 1851 census we find William living at 84 Cambridge St. in Plymouth, one year after his marriage. He is described as a "head builder agent." That sounds like a very responsible position for a man only 23 years old, working for a very famous engineer. The picture at left shows the bridge under construction, giving us a sense of the times. The picture was taken in 1854.

Peter tells Cliff that William had a brother that managed a silver mine in South America. I have not been able to find a record of this brother. I think he may have remembered a family story of Sydney Shaddock 1878–1921, who travelled the world as an engineer and was a major in the army in the first world war. He was the son of his grandfather's brother.

I did find three sisters, Ann (1816-), Mary (1819-) and Susan (1821-), all born in Bradninch. 


Peter writes that William had a brother who fought in the Crimean war. This brother was John Shaddock (1815-1858), born in Bradninch, and named after his father. (This makes it likely that John Shaddock is a name passed down to first born sons in this family. That is one reason why I have John Shaddock born in 1783 as the son of John Shaddock born in 1731 in Culmstock.)

The Crimean war was fought between October 1853 and March 1856. The location was the Crimean Peninsula which up until recently was part of Ukraine. The result of the war was allied victory and the Treaty of Paris.

John was a sergeant in a foot regiment that fought in the Crimea War. He must have joined the army when young because he married quite late, at age 36. He married Ann Tozer, age 38, in Kentisbeare, a small village 7.5 km (5 miles) north east of Bradninch, in 1851. They had no children. He only lived seven years after that, dying in 1858. I do not think it was on the battlefield as he is buried in Bradninch. His wife Ann would live until 1890 and die at age 76. She never remarried. She lies in the same grave as John Shaddock.

William apparently built a house for his family called "Floraville" after this wife. They had six children. In his family tree he shows a "Clifford" Shaddock who moved to London. My research shows his name was "William Cane" and he moved to Guildford, Surrey England. 

William Torrie Shaddock and Sylvia Ann

Andrew Shaddock, who presently lives in California, but has siblings back in England, provided me with pamphlets that were printed of his parents biographies. I have summarized their content.

Sylvia Ann Norris was born in 1912 in Richmond in west London, the first child of Hedley Norris, a London solicitor and his wife Dorothea, a Cordon Bleu cook. It is said she went reluctantly to boarding school in Worthing as a young girl. "She was always glad to return to Richmond, to her mother's excellent cooking and her father's lovely garden. She eagerly anticipated the annual family holiday in Glenelg, Ross-shire, which gave her a lifelong love of Scotland." She was actively involved in her church St. Matthias and sometimes helped at their services."

After school she trained in Domestic Science in London and afterward taught at a specially equipped facility at Fulham. At the beginning of WWII, she was evacuated with some of her students to Woking in the west of Surrey, England.

She married William Torrie Shaddock ("Torrie") in 1940 at St. Matthias. They had met at the tennis club in King's Road.  Three weeks after their honeymoon their apartment was flattened by a bomb. They had to move back in with Sylvia Ann's parents at 87 The Vineyard in Richmond. Sylvia was an air raid warden, which proved invaluable when her husband was posted to Leeds in West Yorkshire, England to take engineering responsibility for airfields in Yorkshire. "She was the only person in Leeds who knew how to fit a baby's gas mask!"

A year and a half later she moved back to Kew in London and resumed her air warden duties. She had a daughter Rosalind in 1946, a son Andrew in 1949 and a son Crispin in 1952. Six months after Crispin's birth, she was diagnosed with a serious illness. After ten weeks in Middlesex Hospital she emerged courageous and determined, devoted to her family and devoting herself to cooking, sewing and knitting. "She became the proud owner of one of the first knitting machines ever produced!"

She had a great love for Richmond and Kew and moved closer to Richmond in 1960 and remembered it when the area around Walpole street was an orchard. The area, with its cherry tree lined streets, was peaceful and friendly. She campaigned for local issues in letters to local newspapers and contacting her local M.P. She was active in the local churches. "In her seventies she made literally thousands of scones for the Sunday teas."

Sylvia was a very caring person, selfless and devoted to her family. "Over the years she befriended and helped countless people and was known for her very great kindness and willingness to put herself out."

William Torrie Shaddock was born in Taunton, Somerset in 1903. He was known by his middle name "Torrie," which was his maternal grandmother's maiden name. He was the only child of Sydney Shaddock, who worked in the construction industry, just like Sydney's grandfather William before him. 

As a child Torrie moved to Plymouth, across the river from Saltash, where his great grandfather had been mayor. He must have developed an interest in the "family business" because he developed an interest in engineering at a young age. 

"He was gifted academically and won an exhibition to Plymouth College, where he enjoyed his school days and won a Kitchener Scholarship to Durham University." He saw little of his father who worked on projects around the world. When the first world war broke out his father fought in France as a major. He survived the war, but soon after, at the age of 42 died, leaving his wife Florence "bereft and without any means of support." She had a hard life, trying to maintain her independence by taking housekeeping jobs. Her son Torrie was later able to offer her his care and took her on holidays around England and Europe.

Despite the challenges of his early life, Torrie was able to graduate with a B.Sc. in 1923, served articles in Durham and worked in Dorset and Devon. "In 1928 he was awarded the Miller Prize by the Institution of Civil Engineers for a project in Poole Harbour." He was active in sports, especially tennis and hockey. "He loved Durham, the worship of its wonderful cathedral and the life of the university. After graduation he was heavily involved in the activities of the Durham Society, serving for many years as Secretary and Vice President, and attending meetings and social gathering until his early 80s."

In 1930 he moved to London and worked for the Ministry of Transportation, where he remained until his retirement in 1968. Like Sylvia, he was very devoted to his family, passing up opportunities for career advancement to ensure his family had a great home life and received a good education. 

"Many will remember Torrie walking around Kew with his fine upright manner, jacket, tie, and walking stick. Torrie was a proper, gentle man with a kind greeting and an other-age courtesy for everyone he met."



William's Children

William's son William Cane Shaddock (1852-1933) followed in his father's footsteps and became a public works contractor in Guildford, Surrey. He married Grace Lander and had nine children. William Cane's son William Henry not only carried his father's and grandfather's Christian name forward, he was a public works contractor as well. 

John Prideaux Shaddock (1881-1956), who appears to have been named after his uncle John Prideaux Shaddock (1856-1939), was educated as an accountant. As a young man he got a job as a bank clerk at Farrow's Bank in Fulham. There is a newspaper article (the London Globe, 6 July 1910) about what happened to him there. In October 1909 he married Dorothy Helen Gould (1880-1971). She became sick and since both were not good at household management (he claimed) he got into debt. He went missing from his post at the bank for three days. The bank examined his books and discovered £384 10s missing. When he returned, he produced the missing money, confessed to his manager that he had stolen the money to try to win enough money at gambling to pay off his debts. Having failed that, he pleaded with the manager not to report him to the law as the only thing keeping him from committing suicide was his poor wife's sake. His employer reported him anyway, and John pleaded guilty. At his sentencing his employer came to his defense by testifying to his good character, so he seemed to buy John Prideaux Shaddock's explanation, at least in part. John must have got off with a light sentence because he left England for the United States, arriving in New York on the Mauritania in August, 1910. 

He apparently traveled to America with his brother, William Henry and his wife. (His wife evidently recovered from her near death experience.)  On the ship's manifest they claim to be citizens of the United States and say they are going to Chicago to join their father. Of course, their father, William Cane Shaddock, the sometime mayor of Saltash, was not in Chicago. And John P. was living in England up to that point. And he made have sighed with relief when his prodigal son John left for North America.

Actually they went to Chicago to join a friend there. John apparently found work in advertising for the J. Roland K. Company. His brother William Henry went on to Canada to visit another brother there.

If I treat John's story of a sick wife and poor household management with some skepticism, it's because the story sounds a bit like a con and advertising is a business that attracts smooth talkers who know how to appeal to people's emotions. And before you argue that not all advertising people fit that description, the fact is John is found Jan 1920 sailing into Liverpool from Valparaiso in Chile on the ship Orcoma. How did he get to Chile, and why was Chile the departure point for his exit from America? His stated occupation is advertising manager, future home England.  If he was so successful in America, why was he returning to England? And why would he not have settled in his old home in Devon, instead of London? 

Andrew Shaddock, a descendant of the Saltash Shaddocks has this to say: "I seem to remember my father in his later years looking at a picture, which I suspect was of John Shaddock and siblings, and my father referred to one, presumably John, as a "black sheep" of the family." Chris Tweed, a descendant of the Culmstock Shaddocks, from which the Saltash Shaddocks probably descend, first pointed out the newspaper article to me. And I think she delivers the final blow to John P.'s familial reputation. In the English 1939 Register John P. is living with his wife in Guilford, south west of central London, working as a "turf commercial agent." He is working at the track and is involved in the betting business. Chris's comment: "...it doesn't sound like a good occupation for someone with his previous history!!" 

William Cane Shaddock's son Thomas Lander Shaddock (1883-1964) immigrated to Canada in 1911. On Nov. 7, 1914 he joined the Canadian army to fight in WWI. In 1915 he married Scottish-born Mary Jane Matheson (1889-) in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They had three children. His son Sydney appears to have died in England at age 12, perhaps in an accident on a visit. Or maybe he was sent there for his health or his education. Thomas' two daughters Rhoda and Flora married and lived their lives in Canada. Thomas spent most of his life in Canada but appears to have retired back to England, where he died in 1964. 

William Cane Shaddock's son George Ewart Shaddock (1885-1943) attempted farming on the Canadian prairies. At the age of 21 he was granted land near Humboldt, Saskatchewan. His attempt at farming appears to have failed. Five years later a census finds him 200 km (123 miles) south,  living in the town of Regina. At some point he returns to England where he dies in 1943. I could find no evidence that he was married. His brother William Henry probated his will.

William Shaddock's son John Prideaux Shaddock also followed in his father's footsteps as a "general contractor" in the area of St. Budeaux, not far from Saltash. He married Lavinia Radden (1861-) in 1881. They had no children.

William Shaddock's son Thomas Shaddock was also a contractor in the St. Germans area, not far from Saltash. He married Augusta Underhay (1856-1920). They had one son and five daughters.


Saltash Shaddock Genealogy
Where William fits within the Culmstock family is shown in the graphic at the top of the Culmstock page and in the genealogy at the bottom of the page. Here is an expanded view of the Saltash Shaddock genealogy.

 2.8.1.1.3 John Shaddock 1765– (Sarah Potter 1755–) Culmstock

         2.8.1.1.3.1 John Shaddock (1783-) (Sarah Case 1785-) Bradninch, Devon

                   2.8.1.1.3.1.1 William Shaddock (1728-1799) Saltash (near Plymouth, Devon)
                                          
                                                  William Cane Shaddock 1852–1933 (Mary "Grace" Lander 1853–1924)  Guildford, Surrey
Grace Aurora Shaddock 1876–1891 

William Henry Shaddock 1877–1956 (Emily Frances Barham 1884–1949) Totnes, Devon
                       Rona Winifred Barham Shaddock 1912–

Sydney Shaddock 1878–1921 (Florence Augusta Hoskin 1880–1937)
            William Torrie Shaddock 1903–1997 (Sylvia Anne Norris 1912–1998) Surrey, England
                            Rosalind Shaddock (1946- ) (Ian J. Pusey)
                            Andrew Shaddock (1949- )
                            Crispin Shaddock (1952- )

Flora Prideaux Shaddock 1880–1880 (Robert Wilson Pinder 1882–1950)

John Prideaux Shaddock 1881–1956 (Dorothy Helen Gould 1880–1971) Guildford, Surrey, England

Thomas Lander Shaddock 1883–1964 (Mary Jane Matheson 1889–) Venton, Devon
Sydney Robert Shaddock 1918–1930
Rhoda Grace Shaddock 1920–2004 (Kenneth Thomas Finneron 1920–1964)
Flora Prideaux Shaddock 1921–2012 (Henry B. Brodie 1919–)

George Ewart Shaddock 1885–1943 Croydon, Surrey

Robert Benwell Shaddock 1890–1971 (Clarice Elsie Penphrase 1889–1970) Torbay, Devon

Clifford Gladstone Shaddock 1894–1949 (Alice Walker 1892–) Torquay, Devon

                                                  Florence Shaddock 1855– (Joseph Pryor 1853--)  Plymouth

                                                  John Prideaux Shaddock 1856–1939 (Lavinia Radden 1861-) Plymouth

                                                  Thomas Shaddock 1857–1929 (Augusta Mary Fair Underhay 1856–1920) Plymouth
                                                          
                                                            Augusta Mary Fair Shaddock 1884–1979 (George Hawkes 1886–1961)

                                                            Maud Shaddock 1886–1919 

                                                            Florence Shaddock 1888–1978

                                                            William Thomas Shaddock 1889–1969 (Lily Katherine Wilton 1892–1968)
                                                                                    Peter J Shaddock 1925–  (Audrey J Lakin)
                                                                                                            Christopher J Shaddock 1954–
                                                                                                            Melanie L Shaddock 1956–
                                                                                    Patricia F Shaddock 1927–2003 (Joseph N Cioppi 1923–2011)
                                                                                    David Michael Shaddock 1934–2005 (Joan E. Sussex 1937–)
                                                                                                            Deborah F Shaddock 1958–
                                                                                                            Jonathan M Shaddock 1959–
                                                                                                             David J Shaddock 1964–
                                                            Anne Prideaux Shaddock 1891–1960

                                                   Sarah Cane Shaddock 1859–1946 Saltash

                                                   Elizabeth Prideaux Shaddock 1861–1948 (Edmund H. Martin 1859–1945) Guildford, Surrey

William's son William Cane Shaddock (1852-1933) followed in his father's footsteps and became a public works contractor in Guildford, Surrey. He married Grace Lander and had nine children. William Cane's son William Henry not only carried his father's and grandfather's Christian name forward, he was a public works contractor as well. 

John Prideaux Shaddock (1881-1956), who appears to have been named after his uncle John Prideaux Shaddock (1856-1939), was educated as an accountant. As a young man he got a job as a bank clerk at Farrow's Bank in Fulham. There is a newspaper article (the London Globe, 6 July 1910) about what happened to him there. In October 1909 he married Dorothy Helen Gould (1880-1971). She became sick and since both were not good at household management (he claimed) he got into debt. He went missing from his post at the bank for three days. The bank examined his books and discovered £384 10s missing. When he returned, he produced the missing money, confessed to his manager that he had stolen the money to try to win enough money at gambling to pay off his debts. Having failed that, he pleaded with the manager not to report him to the law as the only thing keeping him from committing suicide was his poor wife's sake. His employer reported him anyway, and John pleaded guilty. At his sentencing his employer came to his defense by testifying to his good character, so he seemed to buy John Prideaux Shaddock's explanation, at least in part. John must have got off with a light sentence because he left England for the United States, arriving in New York on the Mauritania in August, 1910. 

He apparently traveled to America with his brother, William Henry and his wife. (His wife evidently recovered from her near death experience.)  On the ship's manifest they claim to be citizens of the United States and say they are going to Chicago to join their father. Of course, their father, William Cane Shaddock, the sometime mayor of Saltash, was not in Chicago. And John P. was living in England up to that point. And he made have sighed with relief when his prodigal son John left for North America.

Actually they went to Chicago to join a friend there. John apparently found work in advertising for the J. Roland K. Company. His brother William Henry went on to Canada to visit another brother there.

If I treat John's story of a sick wife and poor household management with some skepticism, it's because the story sounds a bit like a con and advertising is a business that attracts smooth talkers who know how to appeal to people's emotions. And before you argue that not all advertising people fit that description, the fact is John is found Jan 1920 sailing into Liverpool from Valparaiso in Chile on the ship Orcoma. How did he get to Chile, and why was Chile the departure point for his exit from America? His stated occupation is advertising manager, future home England.  If he was so successful in America, why was he returning to England? And why would he not have settled in his old home in Devon, instead of London? 

Andrew Shaddock, a descendant of the Saltash Shaddocks has this to say: "I seem to remember my father in his later years looking at a picture, which I suspect was of John Shaddock and siblings, and my father referred to one, presumably John, as a "black sheep" of the family." Chris Tweed, a descendant of the Culmstock Shaddocks, from which the Saltash Shaddocks probably descend, first pointed out the newspaper article to me. And I think she delivers the final blow to John P.'s familial reputation. In the English 1939 Register John P. is living with his wife in Guilford, south west of central London, working as a "turf commercial agent." He is working at the track and is involved in the betting business. Chris's comment: "...it doesn't sound like a good occupation for someone with his previous history!!" 

William Cane Shaddock's son Thomas Lander Shaddock (1883-1964) immigrated to Canada in 1911. On Nov. 7, 1914 he joined the Canadian army to fight in WWI. In 1915 he married Scottish-born Mary Jane Matheson (1889-) in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They had three children. His son Sydney appears to have died in England at age 12, perhaps in an accident on a visit. Or maybe he was sent there for his health or his education. Thomas' two daughters Rhoda and Flora married and lived their lives in Canada. Thomas spent most of his life in Canada but appears to have retired back to England, where he died in 1964. 

William Cane Shaddock's son George Ewart Shaddock (1885-1943) attempted farming on the Canadian prairies. At the age of 21 he was granted land near Humboldt, Saskatchewan. His attempt at farming appears to have failed. Five years later a census finds him 200 km (123 miles) south,  living in the town of Regina. At some point he returns to England where he dies in 1943. I could find no evidence that he was married. His brother William Henry probated his will.

William Shaddock's son John Prideaux Shaddock also followed in his father's footsteps as a "general contractor" in the area of St. Budeaux, not far from Saltash. He married Lavinia Radden (1861-) in 1881. They had no children.

William Shaddock's son Thomas Shaddock was also a contractor in the St. Germans area, not far from Saltash. He married Augusta Underhay (1856-1920). They had one son and five daughters.



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